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Learn to Check 750, 585, 417 Markings & What Do These Markings Mean?

  • Mar 26 / 2019
  • 0
Antique Gold and Jewelry, Antique Jewelry, Antique Jewelry value

Learn to Check 750, 585, 417 Markings & What Do These Markings Mean?

Silver markings and gold markings symbols are often the simplest way to learn essential information about your gold jewelry. These markings, which are part of a broad range of jewelry stamps, are designed to impart specific information about the gold or silver used in jewelry to the buyer or wearer. Let’s take a closer look at how you can learn to identify 750 gold, 585 gold and other similar markings and uncover what they really mean.

750, 585, 417 Markings

Gold Markings Symbols: 750 gold, 585 gold and more

The most common markings or jewelry stamps you’ll find on gold are these numerical symbols: 750, 585 or 417. These are essentially shorthand for what karat gold your jewelry is made from; specifically, karat refers to the level of purity or fineness in the gold.

750 means 18-karat gold, 585 means 14-karat gold, and 417 means 10-karat gold. You may also find other gold markings symbols on your jewelry which indicate lesser or higher levels of purity, starting from 333 all the way to 999. If the jewelry was made in the USA, you may also notice it says “416” instead of “417” or “583” instead of 585; this is because American regulations allow for gold’s purity to be rounded up in karats. For instance, gold that is technically 13.5 karats can be marked as 14 karat gold.

How to Check For Gold Markings

Whether you’re checking for silver markings or gold markings, there is one essential rule to keep in mind: check, check, and double check. It’s not always easy to find the jewelry stamps on a piece of jewelry, especially if it is an older piece or has come from a foreign market. Once you have practice inspecting your pieces for markings, however, you will find it becomes easier over time to spot them. A good rule of thumb is to look at the underside of the jewelry–such as inside a ring or on the back of an earring post–which is not normally exposed to the area.

Depending on when and where the jewelry was made, you may notice some makers preferred to mark their jewelry with the karat level rather than the purity level (750 gold, 585 gold, and so on); this is not uncommon nor does it necessarily mean your gold is fake. If you suspect the imprint may be fake, it’s time to break out your high quality magnifying glass for a closer look; fake jewelry stamps to look more undefined and are applied in a slapdash fashion when compared to the genuine deal.

Final Thoughts

Whether you’re interested in antique gold jewelry, antique silver jewelry or you prefer modern pieces, it’s important to know what the markings on your jewelry mean and how you can use those markings to further identify the pieces in your possession. Keep the above guide in mind when inspecting your jewelry.